The everyday experiences of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI) people living with disability

Submitted by Sunil Patel on Monday, 23 July 2018 - 5:25am. Cover image

Executive Summary:

This report documents the effects of systemic discrimination on the health and wellbeing of LGBTI people with disability. It is divided into two key sections (Sections 4 and 5). The first reviews the national and international research and policy literatures on the impacts of systemic discrimination, disadvantage and social exclusion on the health and wellbeing of LGBTI1 people with disability and their access to services. The second, smaller section presents preliminary analyses of unpublished data on LGBT people with disability from Private lives 2: The second national survey of the health and wellbeing of LGBT Australians (2012).

KEY FINDINGS

The review found that research, policy and practice on the health and wellbeing of LGBTI people with disability in Australia is fragmented, under-resourced and relies on different, sometimes contrary definitions of ‘disability’. The review documents higher rates of discrimination and reduced service access among LGBTI people with disability compared with people with disability and LGBTI people without disability; greater restrictions on freedom of sexual expression (particularly for LGBTI people with intellectual disability); and reduced social support and connection from both LGBTI and disability communities. It documents a lack of professional training, resources and support for disability and allied health care workers for LGBTI people with disability. It also found that many disability services and workers are unwilling to address the sexual and gender identity rights and freedoms of LGBTI people with disability.

Format: Literature Review
Year of publication: 2018
Author: William Leonard and Dr. Rosemary Mann